"I saw few die of hunger; of eating, a hundred thousand." -Ben Franklin

Friday, June 8, 2012

The Result of a Multi-City/Country/Continent Quest for Kerrygold

Since I first became involved in the Paleosphere, I'd been hearing about the wonder that is Kerrygold butter.  I had never seen or heard of it before-- it isn't in any of the supermarkets near my home in New York (despite what the locator on the Kerrygold website says), and it wasn't in the one near Penn's campus in Philly either.  So I figured that when I went to Edinburgh, there'd be a ton of Kerrygold, given its proximity to Ireland, right?  Wrong.  So when it wasn't in Lidl, Scot-Mid, Tesco, Sainsbury's, or the Middle Eastern markets I went to, I was pretty much convinced that the Kerrygold butter gods hated me and that I'd never find it.  Maybe it was like Brigadoon: it'd only show up once every one hundred years.  Or perhaps it was like the Loch Ness monster: a myth.


During my spring break, I went on a five-city adventure that started off in Amsterdam (Argentine steakhouse heaven-- no problems finding a good steak there!), then moved to Geneva (which is so expensive that I cooked out of my hostel the entire time).  I couldn't find Kerrygold in either place.  Then I headed to Germany, where I first encountered Kerrygold in Berlin's main train station, the Hauptbahnhof.  (Berlin is Paleo heaven.  One word: Sauvage.)  I had an "Oh my god, it actually exists!!!!!" moment of both extreme disbelief and extreme excitement.  This was the butter that the entire Paleo community has been raving about!!  IT'S REAL!!!!  But since I had a four-hour train ride (to Prague) ahead of me, I couldn't hoard a brick of it to see what the big deal was.  (Well, I guess I could've...)  So I settled on some Kerrygold cheddar cheese to snack on instead.  Nom.  However, since I didn't cook at all in Prague or Vienna, I still hadn't tried the most talked-up butter in existence by the time I headed back to Edinburgh.

Fast-forward to mid-May.  Four months in Europe, and still no Kerrygold... but a trip to Dublin changed that.  I was convinced by this point that Kerrygold leprechauns would hide all of the butter before I got there, and I'd spend the rest of eternity missing out on the one butter that puts the Paleo/Primal community into an "OMG NOM" frenzy.  But no!!  I got to Dublin, and Kerrygold was everywhere-- it's even sold in the airport!!!!  AHHH!!!!!  So after sight-seeing all day, I bought a brick of it from the grocery store and headed back to my hostel to cook dinner and finally try this practically mythical butter. It did not disappoint!!!!  It's creamy, smooth, rich, delicious... and totally worth all of the hype.  It's great for both cooking and eating, and I truly don't have words that accurately describe how absolutely incredible this butter is.


I brought my Kerrygold back to Edinburgh.  They must've thought I was insane at airport security for having almost a pound of butter in my backpack!

So I finished off an incredible semester in Edinburgh by smothering everything in Kerrygold, not knowing the next time I'd get to have this fantastical butter again.
I was in for a real treat when I ended my time in Europe with a week in Mijas Costa, Malaga, Spain, for some desperately needed Vitamin D.  (Seriously: don't take the sun for granted.  After living in Scotland for a semester, just seeing the sun makes me insanely happy now.)  I never thought I'd stumble upon Kerrygold there, but I did!!!!  I hadn't even been looking for it, and it was in the supermarket!!  Vitamin D/sun and Kerrygold in the same place??  Paradise!!  My mind was also blown by finding Kerrygold on the plane ride back to the US-- sure, it was a tiny packet of it, but still!  (But thank god for it: it was the only thing I ate... the rest of the meal served was just sad.)

So what exactly is so special about Kerrygold?  It's made from the milk of grass-fed cows!  Grass-fed butter has more carotene, Vitamin A, and Vitamin K2, has a totally balanced O3:O6 ratio, and just tastes so much better than other types of butter.  This stuff is truly incredible, and if you tolerate butter and live somewhere where you can get this stuff, do it!  Really: it's that good.  (And you can also use it to make Bulletproof coffee!)

I can't believe I just wrote an entire post about Kerrygold.  But after a semester-long quest to finally find/try it, it totally deserves its own post... and all of the hype!

Quote of the Day:
"Some people would say they couldn't do without olive oil.  I could do without olive oil a lot quicker than I could do without butter."  -Paula Deen

13 comments:

  1. Glad you finally got to try it, it is amazing butter! I wonder if it was even better in Ireland because it might have been fresher. Sounds like an awesome trip.

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  2. They may not have Kerrygold near Penn, but they do have it in South Philly! You can find it at the Whole Foods at 10th & South. However, they also carry an even better brand (imo) - Smjor. It's also grass-fed but from Icelandic cows. Once a month we buy 4 pounds of it and make ghee. Delish.

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    1. Good to know!! When I get back there, I'll definitely have to check that out!!

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  3. haha.. i think you deserve some free butter from the Kerrygold reps after all that! :) Mmmm Kerrygold. We don't get it in Canada, but I bring it up from the States every chance I get!

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  4. Trader Joes is always well stocked with Kerrygold. It counts as close to Penn, right? It's only a mile walk.

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  5. I found some at Costco today here in Arlington, TX

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  6. This butter is awesome! I totally forget where I found it, but it's so delicious. Kate's butter is also good but I'm not sure if it comes from grass-fed cows.

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  7. In Philly, it's also available at the Trader Joe's, the Superfresh on South Street (in the fancy cheese section, not the butter section) and the Pathmark on Grays Ferry (again, in the fancy cheese section for some reason).

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  8. I don't have anything to say relevant to the this post (sorry) but I did want to say that I was SO EXCITED to come across your blog today! I'm going to be a freshman at Penn next year and I was trying to read up on how people handle eating a paleo diet while in college... and I don't think I could have found a more appropriate blog :)

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    1. This is fantastic news!!!! If you have any questions about Penn or Paleo or anything, I'd be more than happy to help!

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  9. I know this information comes a bit late but Kerrygold is readily available from the larger Sainsburys. I buy mine from the one in Meadowbank, Edinburgh.
    Thanks for your great writings on here. Sorry the Burgh was so rainy this spring. :(

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  10. Have you tried the Kerrygold in the plastic tubs? Costco (here N of Atlanta Georgia) used to carry the bars of (OMG! the world's BEST butter!) but only around St. Pat's day. {sigh}

    I could buy smaller bars at Publix (of all places) but then Publix started carrying it in tubs -- and *I* thought it tasted HORRIBLE! I complained to Kerrygold, and they said they do NOT adulterate the tubbed butter -- but still: YUCK! I tried four tubs over a couple of months-- and actually threw out the final tub! This year, Costco only carried the tubs, no bars at all. (double-yuck!)

    I did find the bars (finally!) at Trader Joes -- but it's 30 miles away!

    Does anyone else hate the tubbed version, or am I just weird?!

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  11. Hello! I am new to the Paleo scene but I have lived in Philly for several years now. I was so excited to find this blog because I am on day three if my paleo lifestyle and feeling a little lost and alone. Can I really eat butter as a "healthy fat" ? It just seems crazy.

    I remember the butter tasting AMAZING when I visited Ireland but I never thought much about why. I guess grass fed cows is the answer.

    My question is this, butter in your coffee? Really? I have heard of cultures drinking buttered tea but I have never tried it. With my Standard American Diet mindset, it seemed like a recipe for putting on weight.

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